A-7 Corsair II familiarization

Cold war, Korea, Vietnam, and Desert Storm - up to and including for example the A-10, F-15, Mirage 200, MiG-29, and F-18.
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piston

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Unread post01 Sep 2022, 05:45

basher54321 wrote:You need a list of Avionics that were on it from the early 1980s which I don't have. That site is probably missing about 50% of the avionics.

Only info I have on Vietnam era is they used AN/APR-25 RWR with the SIDS radar display which apparently gave a bearing to the contact. SIDS is called a Shrike Signal Conditioner and is listed as part of the A-7B, C and E might have been on the A but don't have that info sorry.



I think they had possibility to use both Shrike and HARM in 80-ties, IMHO....

SIDS - Shrike improved display system....

Here, but about A-4:
http://www.chinalakealumni.org/Download ... 20SIDS.pdf

Still it is the same concept they pick for the HARM operations, IMHO...

I am amused that in fact A-7E is not dedicated SEAD platform (like F-100/105/F-4G/EA-6B/18G/16CJ), but still was a prime user of HARM in test and in combat (SA-5 site in Sirte).... They had F-18 IMHO, but used A-7 for this attack.... :shock:
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piston

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Unread post05 Sep 2022, 17:43

basher54321 wrote:Only info I have on the A-7E is that it used a TI AN/AWG-25 HARM Control System, CP-1269 Command Launch Computer and C10035 Control Indicator (which updates the threat library)

Target Steering was on the HUD and the Radar Scope.

HARM Could be used in:

Pr-Briefed (PB) mode by entering details before take off.

Target Of Opportunity mode (TOO) - threat would be highlighted on the RWR.

Self Protect Mode (SP) - for close in pop up threats using the RWR.


I would add this one also.... (It's about Desert Storm - last A-7 battle)...

All we were working with [when it came to detecting active target acquisition radar] was the aircraft’s AN/ALR‑45 RHAWS [Radar‑Homing And
Warning System]. The HARM’s seeker head also provided additional EW [electronic warfare] information. As such, you were somewhat reluctant to get rid of one until you had something locked up


A‑7 CORSAIR II UNITS 1975‑91
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spazsinbad

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Unread post01 Nov 2022, 20:56

From Naval Aviation News December 1970: https://www.history.navy.mil/content/da ... /dec70.pdf (4.7Mb)
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A-7E 12 hour flight NAN BuAero dec70.gif
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos
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Unread post02 Nov 2022, 00:48

Salute!

Giving me flashbacks, Spaz!

Over the July 4th holiday weekend in 1972, my flight commander and I flew non-stop from Seattle, WA to Myrtle Beach, SC in our Sluf's. We used 4 bags on the wings, so extra 1800 pounds each for another 7200 of JP-4.

About 5 hours in flight and we cruised climbed from intial of 20K and finally about 35,000 feet 1000 miles later.

That sucker was great for two main reasons...you always knew where you were and you were not worried about running outta gas.

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"God in your guts, good men at your back, wings that stay on - and Tally Ho!"
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outlaw162

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Unread post03 Nov 2022, 18:43

....you always knew where you were and you were not worried about running outta gas.


Unlike the Phantom....where I'm reminded of the WSO who asked the front seater to turn the heat up 'cause he didn't want to be cold, lost and hungry all at the same time.
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Unread post28 Nov 2022, 04:20

Former Naval Aviator tells which US Navy Jets are the most difficult and the easiest to land on an Aircraft Carrier
27 Mar 2020 Dario Leone

‘I think the Bronze, Silver, and Gold for difficult aircraft to land has to go to Vought aircraft,’ David Tussey, former US Naval Aviator


"...ʻAnd to complete the Vought triumvirate, a derivative of the Crusader, the A-7 Corsair, while better, was also very challenging to land on the carrier. (This was the aircraft that I flew for 800+ carrier landings.) The Corsair suffered from a slow response engine as well as a fast approach speed, so deviations during the approach were very difficult to manage. At least the wing didnʼt move up and down.

ʻHereʼs me [photo] having a hard landing on a badly pitching deck onboard USS Midway. If you look closely, you can see the starboard wheel coming apart. Clearly a controlled crash as were many A-7 Landings. Earned a trip to the bridge on this one.

ʻThe A-7 Corsair was, however, much loved by the Navy for itʼs mission flexibility and effectiveness. So much of its terrible landing traits were forgiven.ʼ..."

Photo: https://theaviationgeekclub.com/wp-cont ... ndings.jpg

Source: https://theaviationgeekclub.com/former- ... t-carrier/
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A-7CorsairHardLandingMIDWAYtussey.jpg
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Unread post28 Nov 2022, 12:50

So the A-7 he says was problematic on carrier landing yet had 800 traps in one? Makes me think he wouldn't of had many traps in anything else with 800 in the Crusader alone.
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Unread post28 Nov 2022, 16:42

Salute!

Good point Rat.

I only had about 600 landings in it cause even with 1,000 hours our combat missions were over 2 hours and 15 minutes average.

I thought it was the easiest plane to land besides the VooDoo, as using the Navy controlled crash technique was a piece of cake. Only had one bad landing where I bumped the flap handle and that stopped the trailing edge flaps from deploying - so leading edge smoothed the buffet but I had about 20 knots more than normal using the standard 17 units AoA. Slid down a wet runway and had to use the hook at the far end. I was a newbie and it was my first night refueling at The Beach, but great lesson learned and I always "beeped" the flaps down several times each approach from then on to ensure they were down.

Before you ask... even tho our approach in the VooDoo was 175 plus 5 knots per thousand pounds of gas above 3,000, you just pointed it and barely flared over the overrun. Aerobraking was easy, and the chute helped with that. Deuce was next due to that neat delta, but we still flared-- had to be careful about buildng up a sink rate if you pulled back more than necessary. The Viper was 4th on my list, and although you could crash it on like I did with the flap problem, it liked a good, smooth flare.

Gums sends....
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"God in your guts, good men at your back, wings that stay on - and Tally Ho!"
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