USAF C-130 Photos

  • usaf 08-6201 2014-01-21b
    USAF MC-130J #08-6201 from 522 SOS seen arriving at Nellis AFB on January 21, 2014. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • HurricaneHunters 97-5303 2009-03-25
    USAF WC-130J #97-5303 from 53 WRS seen departing Nellis AFB on March 25, 2009. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • HurricaneHunters 97-5304 2011-03-22
    USAF WC-130J #97-5304 from 53 WRS seen departing Nellis AFB on March 22, 2011. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • HurricaneHunters 97-5306 2011-04-08
    USAF WC-130J #97-5306 from 53 WRS arriving at Nellis AFB on April 8, 2011. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • TheRock 98-1355 2012-05-23b 314OG
    USAF C-130J #98-1355 from 48 AS (Wearing 314 OG markings) seen recovering to Nellis AFB during MAFEX 12-1. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • TheRock 98-1356 2011-05-18 48AS
    USAF C-130J #98-1356 from 48 AS launching from Nellis AFB during MAFEX 11-1 on May 18, 2011. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • TheRock 97-1353 2011-11-17
    USAF C-130J #97-1353 from 48 AS recovering to Nellis AFB during MAFEX 10-1 on May 19, 2010. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • TheRock 92-0553 2010-05-19
    USAF C-130J #92-0553 from 50 AS launching from Nellis AFB during MAFEX 11-2 on November 17, 2011. [Photo by Bruce Smith]
  • 2013 Spotlight Web JC130 120120 F DW547 016 1267828237 4472
    Fourteen US Air Force C-130Bs were modified in 1959 for a variety of test programs including midair retrieval of film canisters ejected from Discoverer satellites. Discoverer was the cover name of the CIA’s Corona reconnaissance satellite program. This image shows a JC-130B (Air Force serial number 57-0528) with the recovery gear deployed from the cargo ramp about to snag a canister during a training mission over Edwards AFB, California, in July 1969. The capsule and parachute would be dropped from another aircraft at 30,000 feet while the JC-130B crew waited at an altitude of about 18,000 feet. Crews from the 6595th Test Squadron at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, carried out the actual recoveries under a program called Catch A Falling Star. [Lockheed photo]
  • 2013 Spotlight Web C130B C 130B BoundaryLayerControl 001 1267828237 8045
    USAF C-130B was modified off the assembly line in Marietta, Georgia, as a prototype for a Short Takeoff and Landing transport for the US Army. This aircraft (#58-0712) was fitted with a boundary layer air control system that consisted of a wider rudder, single-hinged flaps instead of the standard Fowler flaps, and two Allison YT56-A-6 jet engines under the outer wings. Bleed air from the jets was blown over the flaps and rudder to enhance lift and controllability. First flown on 8 February 1960, this testbed was flown for twenty-three hours before the Army lost interest in what was to be designated the C-130C. The aircraft later served as a NASA research aircraft. [Lockheed photo]
  • 2012 Spotlight C130 PC027 016B 1267828237 2331
    The second C-130E to come off the Lockheed-Georgia Company assembly line in Marietta, Georgia, is shown on an acceptance flight over Alabama in this photo from 1962. The aircraft (#61-2359) was first delivered to the 4442nd Combat Crew Training Group at Sewart AFB, Tennessee. [Lockheed photo]
  • 2011 Spotlight C130 Flightline 001 1267828237 3350
    A lineup of USAF C-130As sits on the Lockheed-Georgia Company production flight line in Marietta, Georgia, in 1957 prior to delivery. One of the first Hercules built, complete with the original Roman nose, sits at the far left. The Hercules in the middle (#55-0005) would eventually be left behind at Tan Son Nhut AB, South Vietnam, as that country fell to Communist forces in 1975. The aircraft to its left (#55-0007) was transferred to the Bolivian Air Force in 1988. The C-130A in the foreground (#55-0009) was destroyed in a rocket attack at Da Nang AB, South Vietnam, in 1967. [Lockheed photo]