MQ-25 US Navy Stingray Program

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sprstdlyscottsmn

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Unread post15 Aug 2017, 00:55

sferrin wrote:And why does NG get the LEAST amount of money? :doh: :bang:

Because otherwise it would be too easy. Grumman is NavAv
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neptune

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Unread post15 Aug 2017, 01:02

sferrin wrote:And why does NG get the LEAST amount of money? :doh: :bang:



Boeing $43,354,421 N19-16-C-0084
Boeing $19,145,579 mod P00005
Boeing $62,500,000
LM $43,606,518 N19-16-C-0086
LM $18,893,482 mod P00006
LM $62,500,000
GA $43,736,111 N19-16-C-0085
GA $18,735,000 mod P00005
GA $62,471,111
NG $35,752,362 N19-17-C-0017
NG $24,797,517 mod P00007
NG $60,549,879
TOTAL $248,020,990

....maybe a used $2,000,000 vehicle??
:wink:
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neptune

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Unread post11 Sep 2017, 23:45

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ts-441032/

US Navy tightens unmanned tanker requirements

11 September, 2017
BY: Leigh Giangreco Washington DC

The US Navy solidified parameters for its unmanned MQ-25 Stingray, setting up a spartan platform that will satisfy not much more than carrier suitability and air refueling requirements. Following years of fluctuating requirements and various UAV incarnations, the navy appears to have nailed down its vision for MQ-25 in its final requirements documents. The service is focusing on the MQ-25’s basic ability to operate from a carrier and adjusted the mission focus for air refueling, according to a Government Accountability Office report released this week. The Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) validated two requirements this July and the service is capping MQ-25’s development costs at $2.5 billion, with funding projected to jump from $89 million in 2017 to $554.6 million in 2022. Although the navy has identified an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability as part of MQ-25’s portfolio, the Pentagon directed the navy last year to shift its focus away from ISR and toward an unmanned carrier based air refueling aircraft. That move reflected a crackdown on MQ-25’s development, which has seen several iterations since the program’s inception early in the last decade.

The navy originally set out to acquire an unmanned tanker but by 2013, the program had evolved into the Unmanned Carrier Launch Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) platform. Three years later, the service restructured the stealthy UCLASS into the Carrier Based Aerial Refueling System, which the navy designated MQ-25. Four companies are bidding for the contracts to develop and produce the MQ-25 fleet: Boeing, General Atomics-Aeronautical Systems Inc, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. As the navy reins in its capabilities for MQ-25, the service is also constraining the program’s development schedule to a maximum of eight years after the start of development, which is scheduled for summer of 2018. The navy plans to limit technology risk during development by mandating the aircraft carry proven subsystems. “If a technology is identified that does not meet this criteria, the navy plans to push that technology into the future and include it only when it reaches the specified level of maturity,” the GAO report states. “As we reported in March 2017, failure to fully mature technologies prior to developing the system design can lead to redesign and cost and schedule growth if later discoveries during development lead to revisions.”
:)
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popcorn

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Unread post12 Sep 2017, 01:51

As the navy reins in its capabilities for MQ-25, the service is also constraining the program’s development schedule to a maximum of eight years after the start of development, which is scheduled for summer of 2018.

Can't happen soon enough.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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neptune

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Unread post12 Sep 2017, 15:42

popcorn wrote:As the navy reins in its capabilities for MQ-25, the service is also constraining the program’s development schedule to a maximum of eight years after the start of development, which is scheduled for summer of 2018.

Can't happen soon enough.


....Is that a waffle on the CNO desire for it to be flying in 2019??
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Unread post12 Oct 2017, 03:12

https://news.usni.org/2017/10/10/navy-r ... d-revealed

Navy Releases Final MQ-25 Stingray RFP; General Atomics Bid Revealed

By: Sam LaGrone
October 10, 2017

Naval Air Systems Command has quietly released the final request for proposals to industry for the unmanned MQ-25 Stingray aerial tanker, USNI News has learned. Last week, the Navy issued the RFP to four industry competitors for the air segment of what will be the service’s Navy’s first operational carrier-based unmanned aerial vehicle ahead of an anticipated contract award by September of next year, a NAVAIR spokeswoman told USNI News on Tuesday. The competitors are Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman and General Atomics. The Navy wants to field the capability on its carriers to alleviate the strain on the existing F/A-18E/F Super Hornets that are burning through flight hours while serving as a refueling tanker for other aircraft attempting to land on the aircraft carrier. Up to 20 to 30 percent of Super Hornet sorties are refueling missions.

While the Navy has been reluctant about the specific goals of the program, the service’s basic requirements will have the Stingray deliver about 15,000 pounds of fuel 500 nautical miles from the carrier. “The MQ-25 will give us the ability to extend the air wing out probably 300 or 400 miles beyond where we typically go. We will be able to do that and sustain a nominal number of airplanes at that distance,” Air Boss Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker said in the September issue of Proceedings. “That will extend the reach of the air wing, and when we combine that with additional weapons we are buying, we will get an impressive reach.” The current effective strike radius of a Super Hornet is about 450 miles, and the MQ-25 could extend the range to more than 700 nautical miles. Of the four companies vying for the business, General Atomics has released the first complete images of its planned bid for Stingray. The aircraft is a wing-body-tail design that shares design characteristics with the General Atomics Avenger design, including a turbofan engine and V-shaped tailfins. The image, provided to USNI News, show the GA Stingray concept fielding a standard D-704 buddy tank refueling system. While company representatives didn’t reveal details of the bid, like aircraft dimensions or internal fuel capacity, they did point out some features unique to the GA bid. The aircraft will have an electro-optical ball like GA’s MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper UAVs; landing gear that pulls into the fuselage, which is reminiscent of the old S-3 Viking anti-submarine warfare aircraft; and a system for maneuvering around the flight deck using gestures from the flight crew, retired Rear Adm. Terry Kraft who now works for General Atomics told USNI News on Saturday. In addition to the carrier suitability requirements set by the Navy, GA has included a margin for growth. “You can see a future for weaponizing, you could see a future for ISR capability. The Navy has already asked us to put hooks in there for a radar and I think it’s very logical that the first spiral would be some type of radar installation,” Kraft said. “At the end of the day, the UAV is a truck.”
:)

....KS-3A modified can carry 30klbs. of JP-5 for 530mi. (combat radius); ten (or more, 90+ are in storage) could be flown manually for a year while the others are converted to QS-3 with the same control systems as the MQ-25 Stingray and flown in 2019 as requested by CNO.
This would relieve the SBugs from tanking, prepare the CVN for unmanned tanker operations and allow for the initial development of the Stingray in a cost effective manner. Simply swap the certified MQ-25 for the QS-3!
:D
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